Partners of Sex Addicts

[spacer size="20"] Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) What is sex addiction? Sex addiction is an obsessive relationship to sexual thoughts, fantasies or activities that an individual continues to engage in despite adverse consequences. These thoughts, fantasies or activities occupy a disproportionate amount of "psychic space", resulting in an imbalance in the person's overall functioning in important areas of life, such as work and marriage. Distress, shame and guilt about the behaviors erode the addict's already weak self-esteem. Sexual addiction can be conceptualized as an intimacy disorder manifested as a compulsive cycle of preoccupation, ritualization, sexual behavior, and despair. Central to the disorder is the inability of the individual to adequately bond and attach in intimate relationships. The syndrome is rooted in early attachment failure with primary caregivers. It is a maladaptive a way to compensate for this early attachment failure. Addiction is a symbolic enactment of deeply entrenched unconscious dysfunctional relationships with self and others. While the definition of sex addiction is the same as that of other addictions, sexual compulsion is set apart from other addictions in that sex involves our innermost unconscious wishes, needs, fantasies, fears and conflicts. Like other addictions, it is relapse prone. How do I know if my partner is a sex addict? Sometimes, it's difficult to know whether someone close to you has an addiction. The addict might hide the addictive behavior or you might not know the warning signs or symptoms. Here are some of the signs and symptoms: * Staying up late to watch television or surf the Web. * Looking at pornographic material such as magazines, books, videos and clothing catalogs. * Frequently isolating themselves from spouses or partners, and doesn't inform them of their whereabouts. * Are controlling during sexual activity or have frequent mood swings before or after sex. * Are demanding about sex, especially regarding time and place. * Gets angry if someone shows concern about a problem with pornography * Offers no appropriate communication during sex * Lacks intimacy before, during and after sex, and offers little or no genuine intimacy in the relationship * Does not want to socialize with others, especially peers who might intimidate them * Fails to account for increasing number of toll - 800 or 900 - calls * Frequently rents pornographic videotapes * Seems to be preoccupied in public with everything around them * Has tried to switch to other forms of pornography to show a lack of dependency on one kind; concoct rules to cut down but doesn't adhere to them * Feels depressed * Is increasingly dishonest * Hides pornography at work or home * Lacks close friends of the same sex * Frequently uses sexual humor * Always has a good reason for looking at pornography (Psych Why can't he/she control his/her sexual behavior? It's important for you to know that your partner is not volitionally involved in these behaviors so you can begin to understand and, perhaps, forgive. Most addicts would stop if they could. It's been said that of all the addictions, sex is the most difficult to manage. This syndrome is a complex mixture of biological, psychological, cultural, and family-of-origin issues, the combination of which creates impulses and urges that are virtually impossible to resist. Despite the fact that acting them out produces considerable long-term negative consequences, the addict simply cannot resist his/her impulses. Individuals who are highly disciplined, accomplished and able to direct the force of their will in other areas of life fall prey to sexual compulsion. More importantly, people who love and cherish their partners can still be enslaved by these irresistible urges. Research has also shown that the inability to control sexual impulses is associated with neurochemical imbalances in the norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine systems. The use of certain anti-depressants (SSRI's) has thus shown to be very effective in treating the impulse control problems of many sexual compulsives. Biological predisposition contributes and combines with psychological factors. One of the reasons the "erotic haze" is so compulsory is that it is an unconscious but maladaptive way to repair earlier disturbed, anxiety-laden relationships. It shores up an inadequate sense of self which results from these early-life interpersonal abandonments, intrusions and misattunements. This combination of biological and psychological factors results in an "affective disorder" in the sex addict. Feeling of depression, anxiety, boredom and emptiness are quickly alleviated by immersing oneself in an imaginary world that provides novelty, excitement, mystery and intense pleasure. Sex addiction is better than Prosac. It heals, it soothes, it contains, it provides a "safe place" free from the demands of actual performance, and it gives an illusory sense of belonging. The sense of empowerment in the illicit sex act rectifies "holes in the soul" and lifts the addict from feelings of inadequacy, insufficiency, depression and emptiness into a state of instant euphoria. Relinquishing this very special (but delusional) mental and physical state can result in a sense of withdrawal which may include mood swings, inability to concentrate and irritability. These symptoms usually disappear in therapy as the sense of self